The Evolution of Sam Harris’s Writing

The Evolution of Sam Harris's Writing

Sam Harris is my favorite author of non-fiction, but this has not always been the case. He is usually classified as one of the “Four Horsemen” (along with Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, and the late Christopher Hitchens), to the point where he has remarked that some treat them as “one creature with four heads.” I’ve read books by all four men, and they are very different. Harris started as my least favorite of the four, and has become my favorite. How did this happen? Well, it took some time.

Sam Harris began his career as a writer with a book called The End of Faith, written in the wake of, and largely in response to, the 9/11 attacks of 2001.

book-cover1

Despite my atheism, I did not care for this book. It bashes Islam too much for my tastes, and Harris is still criticized for this fact, generally by people who have not read the rest of his work. Reactions like mine to this book are rare among atheists, for one simple reason: most atheists have a far less favorable view of Islam than I do. For more on that, please see my previous blog-post, and the earlier one it links to.

Islam is not the only religion criticized by Harris in his first book — not by any means. As someone who has never had a Muslim attempt to harm me, but who has suffered greatly at the hands of certain Christians, I was far more receptive to his arguments against the Christian religion. Many members of that religion noticed those arguments as well, and Harris was deluged with hate mail, much of it from enraged Christians in the USA. He wrote his second book as a response to this torrent of criticism.

book-cover2

This second book paid much less attention to Islam, and far more, as the title implies, to Christianity. I enjoyed it more, but admit that this likely has as much to do with my personal history as anything else. Still, Letter to a Christian Nation remains the only book I have ever read in a single sitting; it was so compelling that I was unwilling to stop reading it until the last page.

Both of Harris’s first books may be described as “beating the drum of atheism,” an activity which is interesting and useful only up to a certain point. To his credit as an author, he realized that writing more books which repeat this process would be waste of time. He therefore decided to move on to other subjects — and, in my opinion, his books improved greatly as a result of that decision. Here’s his next one:

moral-landscape-rev

The Moral Landscape is not a book about atheism, nor religion. Sam Harris is a neuroscientist, and this book considers human values from a scientific point of view:  questions of good and evil, and whether or not such questions can be addressed scientifically. Ethics and morality are things for which some people consider religion essential. Rather than belaboring the fact that he disagrees with this, Harris, in this book, simply makes a compelling case that such topics can indeed be addressed using the scientific method.

This was Harris’s first book after he made the excellent decision to move out, beyond his previous focus on atheism and religion. Were it not for this decision, I would not name Harris as my favorite non-fiction author. The arguments in this book are compelling, I learned much from reading it, and recommend it highly.

Harris’s fourth book tackles the topic of honesty, and its opposite:

lying_cover_184

Is there ever a situation in which lying is justifiable? Most people would say “yes.” Harris disagrees, and, in this very short book, makes a compelling argument for honesty. His move away from the “drum of atheism” continues in this book, and the rule with Harris is simple:  the further away he goes from his original topic of choice, the better his writing becomes.

This brings me to his fifth book, the amazing Free Will.

free-will

Do I have free will?  Do you?  Does Harris?  It certainly seems as if we do, but Harris takes the point of view that free will is an illusion, and supplies ample evidence to support this position. Denying free will is a dangerous game, of course, for, without free will, how can anyone be held responsible for their actions? Harris does not avoid this problem, but tackles it directly. Reading this book has had a powerful impact on how I view a great many things.

There is more of Harris to read, for those who are interested. I follow his blog regularly (http://www.samharris.org), and he has a new major book release coming soon, as well. Since he keeps getting better with each new book, I am looking forward to it with anticipation.

About RobertLovesPi

I go by RobertLovesPi on-line, and am interested in many things, a large portion of which are geometrical. Welcome to my little slice of the Internet. The viewpoints and opinions expressed on this website are my own. They should not be confused with the views of my employer, nor any other organization, nor institution, of any kind.
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3 Responses to The Evolution of Sam Harris’s Writing

  1. Regarding your critique of “The End of Faith,” I completely agree with you. I see the same in Hirsi Ali’s writing and lectures, for obvious reasons. I think she gives Christianity far too much of a pass. I adore her nonetheless and think she and Randi are tied for taking Hitchen’s place among the horse… well… persons.

    However, the Muslims I know are American born and hold the same ideals as I do, regarding the secular part of their lives anyway. I do wonder if things would be different should they gain a majority; but, this is ‘Merica, so I’m not concerned with that.

    As to “Free Will,” reading it caused me an almost violent paradigm shift. I thought it was brilliant and that he made his case well.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. David says:

    Hello Robert
    My Concern is the Moderate Muslims who you consider Friends do not seem able to get themselves to Stop the non-moderate Muslims from wanting to take way or FREE WILL and free speech and Bill of rights. I am not claiming the Christians are any better.
    I see Muslims & Christians as equally oppressive. I have encountered, as you, Much Abuse at the hands of Militant Christians.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0RZIrZT0Uc&t=49s Muslim parade
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppQhleVuWPM Jesus Camp

    Liked by 1 person

  3. David says:

    Do I have free will? Do you? Does Harris? It certainly seems as if we do, but Harris takes the point of view that free will is an illusion,

    I has crossed my mind several times that there was once free will long long ago, but not on this trip through the maze. the question becomes are we in the “positions / conditions” we are in by chance or by our choice or by someone else’s choice.

    Liked by 1 person

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