Standard and Faceted Versions, Side by Side, of Each of the Thirteen Archimedean Solids

These two polyhedra are the truncated tetrahedron on the left, plus at least one faceted version of that same Archimedean solid on the right. As you can see, in each case, the figures have the same set of vertices — but those vertices are connected in a different way in the two solids, giving the polyhedra different faces and edges.

(To see larger images of any picture in this post, simply click on it.)

The next three are the truncated cube, along with two different faceted truncated cubes on the right. The one at the top right was the first one I made — and then, after noticing its chirality, I made the other one, which is the compound of the first faceted truncated cube, plus its mirror-image. Some facetings of non-chiral polyhedra are themselves non-chiral, but, as you can see, chiral facetings of non-chiral polyhedra are also possible.

The next two images show a truncated octahedron, along with a faceted truncated octahedron. As these images show, sometimes faceted polyhedra are also interesting polyhedra compounds, such as this compound of three cuboids. 

The next polyhedra shown are a truncated dodecahedron, and a faceted truncated dodecahedron. Although faceted polyhedra do not have to be absurdly complex, this pair demonstrates that they certainly can be.

Next are the truncated icosahedron, along with one of its many facetings — and with this one (below, on the right) considerably less complex than the faceted polyhedron shown immediately above.

The next two shown are the cuboctahedron, along with one of its facetings, each face of which is a congruent isosceles triangle. This faceted polyhedron is also a compound — of six irregular triangular pyramids, each of a different color.

The next pair are the standard version, and a faceted version, of the rhombcuboctahedron, also known as the rhombicuboctahedron.

The great rhombcuboctahedron, along with one of its numerous possible facetings, comes next. This polyhedron is also called the great rhombicuboctahedron, as well as the truncated cuboctahedron.

The next pair are the snub cube, one of two Archimedean solids which is chiral, and one of its facetings, which “inherited” its chirality from the original.

The icosidodecahedron, and one of its facetings, are next.

The next pair are the original, and one of the faceted versions, of the rhombicosidodecahedron.

The next two are the great rhombicosidodecahedron, and one of its facetings. This polyhedron is also called the truncated icosidodecahedron.

Finally, here are the snub dodecahedron (the second chiral Archimedean solid, and the only other one, other than the snub cube, which possesses chirality), along with one of the many facetings of that solid. This faceting is also chiral, as are all snub dodecahedron (and snub cube) facetings.

Each of these polyhedral images was created using Stella 4d: Polyhedron Navigator, software available at this website.

A Compound of Ten Elongated Octahedra Which Is Also a Particular Faceting of the Rhombicosidodecahedron, Together with Its Dual

Thinking about the post immediately before this one led me to see if I could connect opposite triangular faces of a rhombicosidodecahedron to form a ten-part compound — and it worked with Stella 4d just as it had when I “previewed” it in my head.

compound of ten elongated octahedra Faceted Rhombicosidodeca

The interesting dual of the above polyhedral compound, also a ten-part compound, I was not able to preview in my head (although that would be a nice ability to have), but creating it was easy with Stella:

compound of ten elongated octahedra Faceted Rhombicosidodeca dual

It is difficult, in the dual, to tell what the ten components are. To help with this, in the next image, all but one component has been removed. This reveals the components of the dual to be rhombus-faced parallelopipeds which are quite flattened, compared to most parallelopipeds I have seen before. This polyhedron is isomorphic to the cube, just as the elongated octahedra in the first compound were each isomorphic to the Platonic octahedron. Given that the cube and octahedron are duals, this is no surprise.

Stellated Strombic Hexeconta

Stella 4d may be tried for free, as a trial download, at this website: http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

One of Many Possible Facetings of the Rhombic Triacontahedron

Faceted Rhombic Triaconta

The simplest way I can explain faceting is that it takes a familiar polyhedron’s vertices, and then connects them in unusual ways, so that you obtain different edges and faces. If you take the convex hull of a faceted polyhedron, it returns you to the original polyhedron.

This was created using Stella 4d, software available (including as a free trial download) right here: http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

Four Different Facetings of the Great Rhombcuboctahedron

faceted GRCO

Faceted Trunc Cubocta 2

Faceted Trunc Cubocta 4

Faceted Trunc Cubocta

All four of these rotating images were created using software called Stella 4d: Polyhedron Navigator. You can buy this program, or try it for free, at this website. Faceting is the inverse function of stellation, and involves connecting the vertices of an already-established polyhedron in new ways, to create different polyhedra from the one with which one started. For each of these, the convex hull is the great rhombcuboctahedron, itself.

There Are Many Faceted Versions of the Dodecahedron. This One Is the Dual of the Third Stellation of the Icosahedron.

Faceted Dodeca

The twelve purple faces of this faceted dodecahedron show up on Stella 4d‘s control interface as {10/4} star decagons, which would make them each have five pairs of two coincident vertices. I’m informally naming this special decagon-that-looks-like-a-pentagram (or “star pentagon,” if you prefer) the “antipentagram,” for reasons which I hope are clear.

Stella 4d, the program I use to make most of my polyhedral images, may be tried for free at http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

One Faceting, Each, of the Snub Cube and Snub Dodecahedron

Faceted snub cube

These are facetings of the snub cube (above) and snub dodecahedron (below). I made both using Stella 4d, software you can try for yourself right here.

faceted Snub Dodeca