Expanding the Icosidodecahedron

This is the icosidodecahedron. It’s one of the thirteen Archimedean solids. To make an expanded version of it, I first augmented each of its faces with a prism.

Next, I formed the augmented icosidodecahedron’s convex hull.

This expanded icosidodecahedron has the twelve pentagonal faces (shown in red) and twenty triangular faces (shown in blue) of the original icosidodechedron. It also has sixty rectangular faces (yellow), and sixty isosceles triangles (shown in green). That’s a total of 152 faces.

To do all of this, I used a program called Stella 4d. If you’d like to try Stella for yourself, for free, just visit this website: http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

A Rhombic Triacontahedron, Decorated with Geometric Artwork

To make this rotating .gif, I navigated to the rhombic triacontahedron in Stella 4d, and then loaded images onto its thirty faces, with the image being the one I blogged in the post right before this one. This program, Stella, has a free trial download you can get right here.

A Rhombic Enneacontahedron, Made of Zome

Zome is a ball-and-stick modeling system which can be used to make millions of different polyhedra. If you’d like to get some Zome for yourself, just visit http://www.zometool.com.

A Symmetrohedron Featuring Regular Octagons, Pentagons, and Triangles

The only irregular faces in this polyhedron are the quadrilaterals (kites and rectangles). I made it using Stella 4d, which you can try for yourself — for free — at http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

A Zonohedron Which Is Also a Symmetrohedron

I made this using Stella 4d, which you can try for free at http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

This zonohedron is based on the icosidodecahedron / rhombic triacontahedron compound — more specifically, on its edges. Twelve faces are regular decagons, twenty are regular hexagons, sixty are squares, and the only irregular faces are the thirty equilateral octagons. That’s 122 faces in all.