A Symmetrohedron with Tetrahedral Symmetry

Symmetrohedra are symmetrical, convex polyhedra which contain many faces (not necessarily all) which are regular polygons. In this symmetrohedron, the hexagons and triangles are regular, while the quadrilaterals are isosceles trapezoids. I made this symmetrohedron using Stella 4d, a program you can try for free at this website.

symmetrohedron featuring 10 reg hexagons and 4 eqtriangles and 12 isos traps

A Symmetrohedron

Symmetrohedra are symmetrical polyhedra which have many, but not all, faces regular. I just found one which has square faces, regular hexagons, regular octagons, and a bunch of scalene triangles as the irregular faces.

To form this polyhedron, I started with the great rhombcuboctahedron, then formed its base/dual compound. I then took the convex hull of this compound, and then formed the dual of that convex hull, producing the polyhedron you see above. All of this was done using Stella 4d: Polyhedron Navigator, which you can try for free at http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

Four Symmetrohedra with Tetrahedral Symmetry

Symmetrohedra are polyhedra with some form of polyhedral symmetry, and many (not necessarily all) regular faces. The first two symmetrohedra here each include four regular enneagons as faces.

The next two symmetrohedra each include four regular dodecagons as faces.

All four of these were made using Stella 4d, which you can try out for free at http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

Three Symmetrohedra

Symmetrohedra are polyhedra which have many (but not all) faces regular, and have some form of polyhedral symmetry. Here’s one that has regular decagons and triangles, along with trapezoids appearing in “bowtie” pairs.

symmetroheron featuring regaular decagons.gif

The next one has regular dodecagons and decagons, along with trapezoids which closely resemble triangles, and some very thin rectangles.

122 faces 20 dodecagons 12 decagons 40 trapezoids 30 thin rectangles.gif

Finally, in the last of these three, the regular faces are dodecagons and pentagons. For the irregular faces, there are two different types of trapezoids.

152 faces 12pentqgons 20 dodecagong 60trapsand 60 difftraps.gif

All three of these were made with Stella 4d, which you can try for free right here.

Four Symmetrohedra

Symmetrohedra are polyhedra with some form of polyhedral symmetry, all faces convex, and many (but not all) faces regular. Here are four I have found using Stella 4d, a polyhedron-manipulation program you can try for yourself at http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

octagons and elongates dodecagons.gif

Octagon-dominated zonohedron

regular decagons and triangles, plus elongated octagons.gif
dual of GRID and dual's compound's convex hull 182 faces incl 12 deca 20 hexa 30 squares and 120 triangles

The second of these symmetrohedra is also a zonohedron, and is colored the way I usually color zonohedra, coloring faces simply by number of sides per face. That is why some of the red octagons in that solid are regular, while others are elongated. The other three symmetrohedra are colored by face type, with the modification that the fourth one’s scalene triangles are all given the same color.

These symmetrohedra were all generated using Stella 4d, a program you may try for yourself at http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

A Symmetrohedron with 74 Faces

74-faces-symmetroheron

Symmetrohedra have many regular faces, but irregular faces are allowed in them as well. The octagons, hexagons, and squares in this polyhedron are regular, but the 48 triangles are scalene. Here’s what it looks like with these triangles rendered invisible:

74-faces-symmetroheron-with-the-48-scalene-triagles-hidden

Stella 4d was used to make these images; it may be tried for free at this website: http://www.software3d.com/Stella.php.

Three Convex Polyhedra with Tetrahedral Symmetry, Each Featuring Four Regular Enneagons

FOUR ENNEAGONS

In addition to the four regular enneagons, the polyhedron above also has rhombi and isosceles triangles as faces. The next one, however, adds equilateral triangles, instead, to the four regular enneagons, along with trapezoids and rectangles.

fouR ENNEAGONS AND EQUITS AND RECTS AND TRAPS

Only the last of these three truly deserves to be called a symmetrohedron, in my opinion, for both its hexagons and enneagons are regular. Only the “bowtie trapezoid” pairs are irregular.

four reg enneagons and four reg hexagons and six pairs of bowtie hexagons

All three of these polyhedra were created using software called Stella 4d: Polyhedron Navigator, which I use frequently for the blog-posts here. You can try it for free at this website.

The Second of Dave Smith’s “Bowtie” Polyhedral Discoveries, and Related Polyhedra

Dave Smith discovered the polyhedron in the last post here, shown below, with the faces hidden, to reveal how the edges appear on the back side of the figure, as it rotates. (Other views of it may be found here.)

Smith's puzzle

So far, all of Smith’s “bowtie” polyhedral discoveries have been convex, and have had only two types of face: regular polygons, plus isosceles trapezoids with three equal edge lengths — a length which is in the golden ratio with that of the fourth side, which is the shorter base.

Smiths golden trapezoid

He also found another solid: the second of Smith’s polyhedral discoveries in the class of bowtie symmetrohedra. In it, each of the four pentagonal faces of the original discovery is augmented by a pentagonal pyramid which uses equilateral triangles as its lateral faces. Here is Smith’s original model of this figure, in which the trapezoids are invisible. (My guess is that these first models, pictures of which Dave e-mailed to me, were built with Polydrons, or perhaps Jovotoys.)

24-a-gon_HDR

With Stella 4d (available here), the program I use to make all the rotating geometrical pictures on this blog, I was able to create a version (by modifying the one created by via collaboration between five people, as described in the last post) of this interesting icositetrahedron which shows all four trapezoidal faces, as well as the twenty triangles.

Smith's Icositetrahedron

Here is another view: trapezoids rendered invisible again, and triangles in “rainbow color” mode.

Smith's Icositetrahedron H

It is difficult to find linkages between the tetrapentagonal octahedron Smith found, and other named polyhedra (meaning  I haven’t yet figured out how), but this is not the case with this interesting icositetrahedron Smith found. With some direct, Stella-aided polyhedron-manipulation, and a bit of research, I was able to find one of the Johnson solids which is isomorphic to Smith’s icositetrahedral discovery. In this figure (J90, the disphenocingulum), the trapezoids of this icositetrahedron are replaced by squares. In the pyramids, the triangles do retain regularity, but, to do so, the pentagonal base of each pyramid is forced to become noncoplanar. This can be difficult to see, however, for the now-skewed bases of these four pyramids are hidden inside the figure.

J90 disphenocingulum

Both of these solids Smith found, so far (I am confident that more await discovery, by him or by others) are also golden polyhedra, in the sense that they have two edge lengths, and these edge lengths are in the golden ratio. The first such polyhedron I found was the golden icosahedron, but there are many more — for example, there is more than one way to distort the edge lengths of a tetrahedron to make golden tetrahedra.

To my knowledge, no ones knows how many golden polyhedra exist, for they have not been enumerated, nor has it even been proven, nor disproven, that their number is finite. At this point, we simply do not know . . . and that is a good way to define areas in mathematics in which new work remains to be done. A related definition is one for a mathematician: a creature who cannot resist a good puzzle.