Spinning Dipyramids

I made these videos using my cell phone and a magnetic ball-and-stick polyhedron building system which my wife bought for me. It’s the sticks that have magnets in them, not the steel balls. First, a triangular dipyramid (n = 3). This is the simplest of the dipyramids.

Next, a square dipyramid, also known as an octahedron (n = 4).

Next, for n = 5, the pentagonal dipyramid.

If you limit yourself to dipyramids that have equilateral triangles for faces, that’s the complete set. Here’s what happens when you try n = 6 — the dipyramid has zero height, and collapses into a pair of isosceles trapezoids when lifted.

To get this to work, you’d need to use isosceles triangles, not equilateral ones. The same is true for n = 7 and greater numbers.